Featured Art: Woman in White Chair

 

 

Ellen-Francis-Woman-in-the-White-Chair

“Woman in White Chair,” acrylic, 27.5 x 22.5
By E. Marie Francis, Vero Beach Branch, Florida

 

From the Artist:

“Me Ladies” is the name of a series of drawings that I created over 30 years ago. The early pieces were simple pen and ink line drawings — rather abstract pieces. I later added watercolor paints in order to jazz them up. Over the last 19 years, I started using acrylic paint and a limited palette of white, black, red, and gold. Lately, the themes seem to be a little whimsical. Right now, a little whimsy is nice.  

The Woman in the White Chair

The woman in the white Queen’s chair,

had been reading her love poems with care.

Her thoughts have now carried her into

a dreamlike state,

putting a sweet smile on her face

completely unawares.

 

Featured Art: Pelicans Sitting in the Sun

Pelicans photo

“Pelicans Sitting in the Sun” by Judy Barnett, Golden Gate-Marin Branch, California
McAbee Beach on Cannery Row in Monterey, California

Judy Barnett expresses her creativity through jewelry design, fiber sculpture, wire and metal sculpture, and photography. She enthusiastically tries new media whenever she can. She recently purchased an iPhone 8 Plus and is having fun taking classes and learning about all of its features. 

“I like this photo because it looks like a watercolor painting,” Barnett says.

You can view her other art on Facebook.

 

Featured art: Madonna

sculpture

“Madonna” by Renata Fackler, Central Ohio Branch

 

Two bronze sculptures by Renate Fackler, “Madonna and Baby Jesus” and “Mrs. Plank,” are featured in the Garden of Peace at St. Mary’s Church in German Village in Columbus, Ohio. The Kelley family, who are grandchildren of Mrs. Plank, are responsible for the beautiful garden and the sculptural additions that where installed in the summer of 2019.

 

Featured Art: The Princess and the Unicorn

The Princess and the Unicorn

“The Princess and the Unicorn” (22×18) by Patricia Lipe   
Jacksonville Branch

 

Artist’s statement

This is a painting that literally came on its own. Surrealism, perhaps? I was painting landscapes in southern France and wiped the extra oil paint with a palette knife onto an empty canvas. Later, I looked at that canvas, turned it upside down, and there they were – the princess and the unicorn.

I had seen the original unicorn tapestry in Avignon, but this rendition was not planned. I did add the dragon, however. The painting depicts good (the unicorn who represents creativity) and evil (the dragon). The princess holds up the mirror so the unicorn cannot see the “evil” lurking in the woods.

I used this painting on the cover of my book “Myth, Magic and Metaphor: A Journey into the Heart of Creativity.”

 

Featured Art: Little Bear

Little Bear

“Little Bear,” watercolor, 24h x 22w, by Geri McGriff Davis
Columbus Branch, Georgia

 

Geri McGriff Davis is a graduate of Auburn University with a degree in art and architecture. She also has a master’s degree in counseling and human development, focusing on art therapy. She has taught art for 45 years, from elementary to college level, as well as in her private art school.

Davis is an avid environmentalist and uses her art and lectures as means of informing the public about endangered floral species in Georgia. She has served as her branch’s president and vice president, as well as the Georgia state president and vice president.

Featured Art: Beach Glass

Beach Glass

“Beach Glass,” textile, 44h x 39w, by Bonnie J. Smith
Santa Clara Branch 

 

Artist statement

“As a textile artist, I concentrate on what I see and know. Most important to me is the terrain that surrounds me.

In the last few years, I have been concentrating on the Pacific Ocean. After taking many photographs of the ocean in its many stages, I am sometimes overwhelmed with what is hiding beneath its waves.  

I was awed with an almost aerial city view when I took a photograph from a bluff at Moss Beach. After studying the image on my computer, I wondered if I could create artwork imaging beach glass lying on the ocean floor. This became the idea for Beach Glass. I have since used a similar pattern to recreate other locations that I have come upon in my photographic journey near my home. I have now created a series of four textiles using this image, altering it to accommodate the type of fabrics and the story I tell with the finished artwork.”

 

Featured Art: Rebirth

"Rebirth" painting

“Rebirth,” watercolor 19 (by 24) by Janine Wilson 
Yucca Branch, New Mexico

janinewilsonart.blogspot.com

 

Janine Wilson wants the world to know that the Yucca Pen Women branch in New Mexico is alive, well and growing.

Wilson started painting after retirement in 2007. After painting realistic watercolors for years, she is exploring abstract watercolor. 

“Dancing with the paint is very freeing. You follow what it wants to do,” she says. 

She painted “Rebirth” after the death of her painting mentor. The woman appeared, reaffirming the creative spirit.

 

Featured Art: Queen of the Night

Queen of the Night photo

“Queen of the Night,” 6 by 6 photo, by Polly Curran
Sarasota Branch, Florida

pollycurranphotography.zenfolio.com

 

Artist’s statement

The “Queen of the Night” is an extraordinary plant. It is prized for its excellence in bloom, size, fragrance — and the fact that it only blooms for a single night each year. It is also called “night-blooming cereus,” a subtropical cactus.

I have this plant in my garden and enjoy watching the progress from a small bud to the moment it begins to turn its face upward and finally show its full bloom, maybe 6 inches in diameter. I  wrote a haiku for this very special moment:

She makes her appearance hidden in darkness

Behold her radiance for one night only;

This remarkable Queen of the Night

 

Featured Art: The Potato Chip Wars — Call to Battle

Mara-Levin-The-Potato-Chip-Wars-Call-to-Battle,-oil-on-cradled-birch-panel,-20-x16

The Potato Chip Wars: Call to Battle by Mara E. Levin; Wellesley Branch, Massachusetts 

Oil on cradled birch panel, 20 by 16 inches

www.maralevin.com

 

Mara E. Levin is a fine artist, graphic designer, illustrator, and art educator. She studied with modern masters including Congor Metcalf, Lloyd Lillie, David Aaronson, David Ratner, and Nick Edmunds while earning her bachelor of fine arts degree from Boston University. Her subjects include landscape, cityscape, still life, the figure, and portraiture. She is also deeply interested in studio methods and materials, frequently experimenting with new mediums and techniques, and often constructing and finishing her own painting supports.

Artist statement

This painting is from my series, The Potato Chip Wars, painted from photographs I took at the popular Horseneck Beach in Westport, Massachusetts. The bugler calls the avian troops to assemble for the next battle. Or is he issuing a challenge?
This peaceful scene, the first of the series, is marked by the shimmering beauty of nature and the day. It evokes the calm before the stormy fight for chips.

Featured Art: Shawme Pond Swans

Kathryn-Kleekamp-Shawme-Pond-Swans

“Shawme Pond Swans” by Kathryn Kleekamp, Cape Cod Branch

Oil on Canvas, 9 by 12 inches 

www.SandwichArt.com

 

The story behind “Shawme Pond Swans,” in the artist’s own words:

 

 I live on Shawme Pond in Sandwich, Massachusetts. I’ve delighted in the annual event of watching our resident pair of swans build their nest while the air is still cool in early spring. The first sighting of the tiny new cygnets is usually around Mother’s Day.

Two years ago, the swans had a beautiful family of eight babies, right on schedule. Unfortunately, nature is not always kind. Our pond has many predators — snapping turtles, coyotes, raccoons, and owls. One by one, the number of cygnets diminished. However, several weeks later, I was relieved to see the pen (female swan) once again sitting on her nest.

This second nesting time seemed particularly long. I watched the pen, day after day, in rain and wind, patiently sitting on her nest, denying herself feedings and baths. My heart was deeply touched at her unwearied care. Happily, once again she had a clutch — this time, six cygnets.

A week or so later, when she and her mate came to the shore to visit, they were alone. I knew the devoted pair would never leave their little ones and once again, I was heartbroken. I can’t begin to express my agony over this second cruel blow.

As they glided closer to shore, however, the pen opened her wings and I saw a beautiful cluster of tiny, gray heads tucked in together on her back. In an instant, my tears were those of great joy and happy relief. I raced into the house to get my camera. This oil painting is from one of the photos I took that morning, happily catching the last hesitant cygnet still on mom’s back.

—Kathryn Kleekamp

P.S. Out of the six, five cygnets grew to adulthood and were quite breathtaking to see as they flew away to find a new home together.