Featured Art: Vintage Trucks in Sedona

Gloria Sampson's "Vintage Trucks in Sedona"

“Vintage Trucks in Sedona” by Gloria Sampson, Columbus Branch (Georgia)
Watercolor, 18.5 x 28.25 

 

Gloria Sampson’s goal is to paint every day. She works mainly in watercolor, pen, and ink.

A resident of Columbus, Georgia, Sampson divides her time between there and Walnut Creek, California. She earned a bachelor’s of fine arts degree with a major in interior design from the California College of Arts (and Crafts) in Oakland. As an interior designer in the Bay Area for many years, she demonstrated her love of its Victorian architecture by portraying it in pen, ink, and watercolor.

Sampson’s fascination with travel to study art and culture has resulted in more than 35 sketch books from around the world. Three of these books have been published.

In 2015, she donated 100 original paintings to the Columbus State University Library Archives from her book, “Historic Churches and Temples of Georgia, a Book of Watercolors and Drawings,” published by Mercer University Press. She was the featured artist in the Sept/Oct 2018 issue of Southwest Georgia Living magazine.

To learn about Gloria Sampson and her work, see her work on the Colubmia Artists Guild website.

 

Featured Art: Twin Creek Vineyard

Chella Gonsalves, Modesto Branch, California
Twin Creek Vineyard, oil,  9×12 inches

 

Known mainly as a plein air artist, Chella Gonsalves portrays rural landmarks, rivers, architectural structures, and historical homesteads with oil paints, emphasizing light and dark contrast.

“California’s Central Valley provides many inspiring vistas, including vineyards, orchards, rivers, parks, and mountains. This particular vineyard is located near Lodi, California, at the Robert Mondavi Winery. The composition of the old oak, the colors of the vines, the light and shadow, and the distant scene all attracted me to this location for a plein air painting.” — Chella Gonsalves

 

 

Featured Art: Echo #3

 

Susan Crave Rosen, Chesapeake Bay Branch
“Echo #3,” acrylic and collage on paper, 23×27 inches

 

“I have been painting for over 25 years, beginning when my husband and I retired to Virginia. Starting with watercolor, as many artists do, I wanted a more opaque, sturdy medium and moved to acrylic about 15 years ago. I have added collage of my own painted papers to layered acrylic, often embellished with line.” —Susan Crave Rosen

 

Featured Art: Billowing In

Doris Mady, Greenwich Branch, Connecticut
“Billowing In,” 20×10 oil

 

Doris Mady considers herself a plein air painter. When asked, “Why plein air?” she answered, “because I feel alive when I’m outside and the world has so many messages to give us.”

A graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology, Mady also studied at the School of Visual Arts, Westchester Community and Skidmore Colleges. Following a long, successful advertising career as creative director and graphic designer in some of advertising’s Top Twenty advertising agencies, she decided to pursue her first love: oil painting.

 

Featured Art: The Watchkeepers

 

The Watchkeepers photo

“The Watchkeepers,” photograph by Jane E. Allen, Huntstville Branch (Alabama)

 

 

One day, Jane and her husband traveled down a dusty country road in Weumpka, Alabama. As they neared Lake Martin, they discovered an isolated burial site near a church. 

The inscription and poignant epitaph engraved on the granite included the words “A Child of Innocence.” The words “Our Angel” were tucked inside a heart in one corner of the stone. Praying hands and a kneeling angel were in other corners. 

A ceramic Dalmatian, bear, deer, a stonewashed cherub, and a wrought-iron nymph were scatted about the surface of the grave, as if keeping watch over the site. Allen, captivated, photographed the unusual array of compelling objects.

Allen became a letters member in 1984 after winning writing contests sponsored by the Montgomery Branch. She added the art qualification to her membership after several of her photos won awards and were published.

“After retiring in 1994, I finally had the time to enjoy the outside world and its fascinating subjects, she says. “Sometimes, I write a poem and snap a photo; at other times, I capture a subject with my camera and then write the poem.”

 

Featured Art: Gallery Hopping

 

Gallery Hopping embroidery

Carol Nipomnich Dixon, Connecticut Pioneer Branch  

Gallery Hopping, embroidered assemblage on felt, 13-inch square, framed

 

Statement from Carol Nipomnich Dixon: I have been drawing, painting, photographing, and experimenting with mixed media collages since I was a child. I like to think that the child in me still appears in the art I do, along with more mature “soul”, feeling, intelligence and wit, expressed through color, texture, shape and composition. For me, art needs to convey a personal, original point of view, along with strong visual elements and well-executed techniques. My inspiration comes from my own experiences and emotions, nature, varied cultures, historical eras, and art over the ages, ranging from Ming Dynasty squares to paintings by Klimt, Kandinsky and Krasner and collages by Schwitters. My most distinctive works are my small embroidered collages, which often incorporate contemporary papers, original photos, and found objects into traditional stitchery. I also owe a debt to my Russian-born paternal grandparents, my grandmother who taught me to embroider and my tailor grandfather who gave me fabric remnants from his shop.

Featured Art: 19th Century Lady

 

19th Century Lady painting
Patricia Daly-Lipe, Jacksonville Branch, Florida
19th Century Lady, oil, 26 by 30 (includes frame)

 

Statement from Patricia Daly-Lipe: The portrait is based on an old photo of a friend of my grandmother (on my mother’s side). However, I do not know who she was. I was intrigued, however, with her look. So much can be read in those eyes.

 

Featured Art: Confetti Mountain

 

Confetti Mountain painting

 

Katie Turner, Central New York Branch

Confetti Mountain, watercolor on paper, 18 by 24 inches

 

Statement from Katie Turner: Exploring abstract patterns formed by nature is part of my interest here. The simplicity of a rugged landscape balanced with hard crisp edges speaks of internal relationships to me.

 

Featured Art and Poem: Garden of Ethos

Garden of Ethos painting

Oil on canvas (90 by 50) by Dianne Lynn Benanti, Palm Springs Branch, California

 

Dianne Lynn Benanti is a self-taught artist who creates large scale contemporary works as well as traditional portraits. Besides being an artist, she composes music and has written a children’s book. She highlights NLAPW on her website, and says, “I’m very honored to be a part of such a great organization.” Her art, book, poetry and songs can be viewed at www.benanti.com.

Carol Mann is a poet and author in the Palm Springs Branch. Her poem was inspired by Diana Benanti’s painting of the same name.

 

 

The Garden of Ethos

 Carol Mann, Palm Springs Branch

 

together we gather in the garden

worried, contemplative

stoic, sad

our world view guiding our thoughts

our life experience

bonding us

 

sisters they call us

bearers of the oral story

of man and his tradition

of beliefs in a god   or not

 

teachers they call us

bearers of society’s mores

culture, the written word

 

mothers they call us

bearers of children

nurturers of body, soul

family guide in crisis and joy

 

daughters they call us

our mothers’ students

learning ways to cope

to keep dreams alive

 

wives they call us

joined in ceremony

partners through life’s

trials and uncertainties

 

But mostly they call us women

governors of our own destiny

strong, problem solvers

ever emerging

 

they call us women

finding strength in our sisters

in times of sadness

finding strength in our sisters

in times of great happiness

finding ways to go on…

Always

 

 

Featured Art: Water, Water, Everywhere

Bonnie J. Smith, Santa Clara Branch; textile, 74 x 63

Over the years, Bonnie J. Smith watched as the California drought lowered the level of the San Luis Reservoir in Merced County. She wondered if she would ever again see green grasses growing around it or water lapping up the sides of its vast bowl.

Finally, rains started and never seemed to stop. Highways, rivers, salt marches and homes flooded. Smith was excited to see how well the reservoir held up under the torrential storms.

It was a glorious sight to see so much water! When the rains let up, she knew the water would eventually make its way through the Santa Clara Tunnel and Conduit, through the Coyote Pumping Station in the Santa Clara Valley, then finally to her home.

The idea for her textile artwork, “Water, Water, Everywhere,” sprang from her being a witness to such an abundance of rain in a land of drought.