Featured Art: Spring


Spring by Anne Yates

Anne Yates, Portland Branch, Oregon

Acrylic on gallery-wrapped canvas, 8×10

Anne Price Yates is a West Coast neo-impressionist artist working in oil, acrylic, and watercolor. She was drawing people by kindergarten and received encouragement and recognition of her talents from teachers very early on.

She studied at Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh from fifth grade. By age 12, she was experimenting with oil, acrylic, and casein paints. At 14, she was among the youngest of 16 students selected to research, design, and paint four large backdrop murals for a Medieval and Renaissance Arms and Armor exhibit at the museum.

As an art major at Florida State University, Yates focused on figure drawing and portraiture.

After painting with a plein-air oil painting group in Provence in 2000 and 2001, her focus shifted to landscapes and her style evolved toward impressionism. Monet, Sisley, Pissarro, and Wolf Kahn have influenced her work.

Featured Art: Passage to the Past

Watercolor, 24×18

Geri M. Davis, Columbus Branch, Georgia

Geri Davis’ life is dedicated to creating, promoting, teaching, and counseling with art.

She has taught art for over 40 years. Many of her students have incorporated her philosophy of art into their personal lives: “Know your subject well, plan your journey, then enjoy the trip.” 

At age 52, Davis returned to college and got a master’s degree in counseling and human development. Her specialty is using art in a therapeutic manner.

Davis has served as NLAPW Georgia state president and vice president, branch president and vice president, and programs chair. 

Featured Art: Forgotten Treasure

Mary Lou Griffin
Diamond State Branch, Delaware

Forgotten Treasure: Grandma’s Bedroom Chair 
Pastel, 8 x 10

Grandma's-Chair by Mary Lou Griffin

 

I never got to know Leocadia Wielgorecki, my mother’s mother. She died several years before I was born. I only heard stories about her from my mother and my older brother and sister, as my grandmother lived with them. However, I am the one with her bedroom chair sitting in my basement.

Leocadia Wielgorecki

Grandma Leocadia Wielgorecki

That chair has traveled from state to state and house to house with me for many years. It sat tucked away in a basement corner until it was time to move again. I had great intentions of refinishing the wood and recovering the seat and pillow and using it — but that never happened. Even if I had restored it, I have no place to put in my downsized home.  

So here this chair sits, sadly looking at me when I am in my basement studio. Somehow, I cannot just throw it out. It’s one of the very few things I have that belonged to Leocadia. And besides, I grew up with that chair. I have memories of my dad sitting in it and changing his shoes after work each day. I remember my mom picking out that printed fabric to recover the seat and pillow. It’s not a fine piece of furniture. The fabric is faded, and the seat has lost its ruffled skirt. It’s seen better days, but it has history.

So, on a recent weekend, I decided to pay tribute to Leocadia, my parents, and “the chair.” I did this painting of it. It’s not a painting I would expect someone to buy. The chair is tired and worn. But by painting it, I somehow feel I’ve given it a new life just the way it is.

— Mary Lou Griffin