Featured Poem: If I Forget You

By Carmen Meadows
Atlanta Branch

 

 

If I forget you, darling one, as I grow old and frail,

I have a secret treasure chest no moths or rust assail.

 

 

The day I fell in love with you it started filling up.

I keep old pictures of us there, dried rose and buttercup.

Remember when we fished that day you brought our picnic fare?

You won my heart right at that spot, a treasure gathered there.

 

 

You wrote a poem as a gift. It’s framed beside our bed.

I read it every morning; it helps to clear my head.

You’ll find it in my treasure chest.  It sounds just like your voice,

A gentle rumble kind and sweet, it rings as I rejoice.

 

 

As we’ve grown old, we’ve faced some trials.  Together we remain.

Such jewels and gems you’ll wonder at brought forth from deepest pain.

We’ve watched the sun both rise and set, sweet etchings on my heart.

We’ve sat and laughed and sipped our cup creating precious art.

 

 

Your sacrifice and kindness are found in great excess.

You’ve led and loved and served me far beyond my mess.

You’ve loved me with a love both healing and enduring.

You’ve filled my treasure chest to full, no wait–it’s overflowing!

 

 

Faith and Hope are needful here, but Love is everlasting.

You’ve helped me store my treasures with all the pearls you’re casting.

Together we enjoy the precious gifts of living

Looking forward to the future and all its days are giving.

 

 

If I forget you, darling one, as I grow old and frail,

I have a secret treasure chest no moths or rust assail.

 

 

You helped to fill my treasure chest well before I held you.

I keep old pictures from your life of youth and growing stature.

There are happy days of sun and cheer and even some sad tears.

I’ve pondered each event and cherished each new year.

 

 

I am blessed beyond all measure to be your confidant,

To have those deep discussions and watch the girl grow up.

From ponytail to wedding veil I have so many treasures.

I count each moment priceless among my dearest pleasures.

 

 

Faith and Hope are needful here, but Love is everlasting.

You’ve helped me store my treasures with all the pearls you’re casting.

As I have walked with you, one day you’ll walk with me.

I hope to hold your hand and trust what I can’t see.

 

 

If I forget you, precious one, as I grow old and frail,

I have a secret treasure chest no moths or rust assail.

 

 

Comments

  1. CARMEN MEADOWS says

    Charlene,
    Thanks for your kind words! I do pray for many more years of love and life for you and your husband!

  2. Carolynn says

    Lovely poem. I enjoyed the vivd descriptions very nice poem with great feeling and gentle rhythm.. s

  3. Dorothy Kamm says

    Your poem reminds me of an old embroidered sampler I saw on display at the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine in 2005:

    All to myself I think of you —
    I think of the things we used to do.
    Think of the things we used to say,
    Think of each happy yesterday;
    Sometimes I sign and sometimes I smile,
    But I keep each olden, golden while
    All to myself.

    Each one of us has a treasure chest filled with many wonderful memories. Carmen, your poem reminds us to look inside for Faith and Hope and Love everlasting.

  4. Barb Whitmarsh NLAPW says

    This is one powerful poem. Very well constructed and its a
    wonderful tribute to a loved one. One of the best I’ve ever read.

  5. Charlene Holloway says

    This poem expresses how if one loses their memory, that she wants to let her significant other/spouse know without doubt they have had a life of joy and fun. This particular poem reminds me of myself and my husband of 53 years. When we married Feb. 4, 1967, my husband said we would grow old together. With adult children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, we have shared so much joy and still hoping to enjoy more in years ahead. This poem was well-written with much emphasis on the ‘memory’ and how as many folks have grown older, they have begun to be very forgetful.With my Nursing career as a Visiting Nurse(R.N.) teaching family members and victims of Dementia/Alzheimer’s Disease how to cope and care for loved ones in the home– Bravo Carmen Bravo!

    • CARMEN MEADOWS says

      Charlene,
      Thanks for your kind words! I do pray for many more years of love and life for you and your husband!

  6. This is a lovely, touching poem. Thank you for creating it and for sharing.

  7. Lois Batchelor Howard says

    Carmen, I wrote and wrote my congratulations to you. They were/are extensive. Then when I was filling in my name and email, this space went blank. I’ll start again. I think your poem is beautiful, beautiful. The way you describe your love is wondrous. I was a bit confused…because you magically interweave past, present, and future tenses. I feel your husband has passed because of your sentences, “As I have walked with you, one day you’ll walk with me. I hope to hold your hand and trust what I can’t see.” I sensed ‘after death’ in these words, but then I think no, he, too, is alive, so much present tense evident. I’d love to know. What comes through so clearly is the depth of love that warms forth from your treasure chest. I love the way you write; it is musical and artistic, a tempo and painting in your words. Thank you, thank you, Carmen. Your poem has touched my heart.

    • Carmen Meadows says

      Hi Lois,
      Thanks for your kind words. The sentence you refer to is written to my daughter anticipating her care of me in my last years. My husband is still here. We are celebrating 39 years of marriage and caring for his mother who doesn’t know who we are anymore. So happy that this spoke to you!

      • Donna Puglisi says

        Very touching poem! It speaks volumes about everlasting love and friendship over the years. I still love to see couples holding hands, be they young or old. How precious is love in this world!