Creative Inspirational Wisdom: Self-Culture—Being Without Speaking

This week, Elizabeth Diane Martin explores how individuality influences creativity.


 

If there is one thing constant in human nature, it is that each of us reduces the chaos outside of us by creating a highly personal and private environment of one human being: yourself.

 

There is no straight path in the swirl held in our private premises. We are a rolling conundrum of apparent contradictions, living life at four levels—intellectually, emotionally, physically and spiritually—automatically and intuitively. This self-culture ensures the survival of personal identity, what distinguishes you from all other persons. It is individuality, the source of original work.

 

You have a natural inner navigation system that always works for you to maintain ownership of your own identity. In hindsight, we see this more clearly. To get a feel for the path your life unconsciously indicates, divide your life into 12-year segments: birth to age 12; age 13-24; age 25-36, and so on. Reflect on how you felt at the end of each phase, and identify a major decision you formed about life, based on your experiences up to that point.

 

By making these 12-year jumps, major points rise above the run of years, forming a logical sequence. The shape and intention of your self-culture comes out of what life gave you and what you made of it.

 

CREATING FLOW

 

The flow of life comes when the heart, mind, soul and body are united in purpose. The heart and spirit are anchored outside of time, and that attachment to timeless intangible values keeps us on course with meaning. It is a reaching that goes beyond the physical world and draws us toward the inspiration that fuels life.

 

You may have thoughts in the back of your mind about something others couldn’t imagine possible. But it seems feasible to you. Secret hopes give you a sense of autonomy, and prepare you to follow your dream.

 

The heart skips the intent of the mind and triggers action that is spontaneous, genuine, capable and easy. You have greater impact through the things you love to do, more than in the things you have to do. We don’t call it ‘work’ when it’s a thing that we love to do. The unseen action of heart-and-spirit infuses your mind, emotions and strength with purpose.

 

Our natural tendency is to lean forward, toward the future. It’s that leaning forward that is the basis of love. What stirs the heart toward love is unconscious, self-renewing, positive and unquenchable. You are willing to extend yourself in the direction your heart is stirred. Extending yourself – exposing your true self – increases love. Beauty in art, music and artful writing cultivates love; childlike innocence, kindness, friendship are things that encourage us to “lean forward,” to take chances in life.

 

Leaning forward is the subtle guiding influence in your heart, and it speaks to your unconscious mind in whispers. Unrealized intentions are held in the subconscious, waiting for an opportunity or the right time to be carried out. Involuntary response is love that acts without checking in with your conscious mind, and love will always win, no matter how long it takes.

 

NATURAL, INSTINCTIVE CREATIVITY

 

Inspiration breathes life into your heart, first, and then invigorates your whole being. Heart motivation makes work light, and you become renewed as you work. This is the life of a creative person.

 

Workers in the arts find that life’s downs enhance its ups, in a way that refines our perception of good, or identifies the un-good, in contrast. In the arts, we feature one or the other, or put joy and loss together in a place where they complement each other.

 

There are times when you follow your inspiration, regardless of the obstacles, because you cannot do otherwise. For others, there may be a choice, but when your heart compels you, you will eventually yield or become increasingly unhappy with yourself. Creativity is the reward of living.

 

Our faculties work best, and contentment is achievable, when we are inspired – when we live and work out of creative impulse, with the spontaneity of breathing. All that you are fits perfectly in your life. Allow it. Lean into the good and create!

 


Elizabeth Diane Garcia Martin of Pikes Peak Branch NLAPW writes about the attributes of originality. If creativity is to be understood, the internal experience of the person must be understood. Whether it is in the arts, or in the more subtle expressions of love and devotion, originality is the gift each woman brings to her life and out into the lives of others. Elizabeth uses insight as an artist, and knowledge as a system analyst, to understand the design of human nature. In the raw design of her own nature, she discovered the natural system that follows the first breath of original thought. 

Elizabeth will release her first major publication in January 2018, a book that explores the spontaneity that characterizes a person’s unique life path. Stay in touch with Elizabeth through her website and The Art of Perspective business page on Facebook.

 

 “Open Old Book Page On Wood Table With Flying Books…” by khunaspix / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

OUR GUEST BLOGGING SERIES WILL END ON OCTOBER 13th. Submissions for the series are now closed. We thank all Pen Women who submitted work for our Creative Inspirational Wisdom and It’s A Creative Business guest blogger series. We look forward to giving an update on the status of Creative Genius at Work, an anthology that will include posts from these two series, soon.

 

Creative Inspirational Wisdom: My Creative Workspace

This week, Marsha Perlman shares how natural beauty inspires her creativity and her process.


 

My inspiration for writing comes from the vast natural environment that surrounds me. My work space is the outdoors, and I am an “outdoors person.”

 

Living part of the year in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains assures me no shortage of poetry subjects. My backpack carries a notebook, pencils, a ruler, a small shovel, a covered plastic container, a canteen, a snack, a rain jacket and a camera.

 

I choose a topic and spend blocks of time observing and taking notes as I move around the area by bike and foot. Or I choose a destination that is more flexible and allows for returning often to view changes that occur.

 

When I take many notes in the field, there is occasionally the problem of not recalling the sensory data. Therefore I immediately describe the words that I can’t retrace later, such as bird songs. Before I leave my subject, I scan my notes to be certain I have all the information I need. Sometimes, I take a few photos.
Once at home I sit at my desk and in pencil, write the first draft of my new poem. I read it aloud several times for obvious changes in grammar, spelling, punctuation or repetitive words. Printing is next and then I set the work aside for a week.

 

When I am ready to revise, I ask another person to read the poem aloud. Then I reread and rethink the text several times again, each time with a fresh eye for accepting, eliminating or adding another new word choice, better sentence structure or organization.

 

I often return to the location of the poem, if it is available and ask myself if I need to rework any lines. If so, I repeat the process. I want to be certain all my ideas are clear to the reader.

 


Marsha J. Perlman writes poetry and non-fiction. Her environmental poetry book, SPIRIT LIFE, received 1st Place at NLAPW’s Florida State Conference. TASTE LIFE TWICE, a memoir of her evolution from reticent and acquiescent to assertive and empowered, continues to receive excellent reviews. Her work appears in Until They Have Faces, Unraveling Mysteries, and Women’s Voices in the 21st C. As a photojournalist, she received awards from Colorado Press Women and has also co-produced a Latin American FM program. She participated in ArtPoems as an active member of Southwest Florida Branch NLAPW. Learn more about her at www.marshajperlman.com.

 

“Colorado Mountains” by Liz Noffsinger / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

OUR GUEST BLOGGING SERIES WILL END ON OCTOBER 13th. Submissions for the series are now closed. We thank all Pen Women who submitted work for our Creative Inspirational Wisdom and It’s A Creative Business guest blogger series. We look forward to giving an update on the status of Creative Genius at Work, an anthology that will include posts from these two series, soon.

 

 

Art of the Week: Dancers

Mara Viksnins

Pensacola Branch

Dancers

16” X 20” Acrylic

 

 

Mara Viksnins received her art degree from the University of West Florida twenty years ago. It has always been her belief that one needs to strive forward by creating new and exciting works.

 

Recently, she has rediscovered old works and given them new life. One work was a mixed media piece called “Dancers 1,” which was juried into/first displayed in an earlier NLAPW Biennial. The Pensacola Branch published an art and poetry book called Nobis: Making Others See in 2016 and used that work for the cover.

 

Now, fast forward to a call to artists for a juried show called “Digital Schmigital.” Obviously, this show required a digital work. Viksnins had never entered a digital show, so she challenged herself to create a digital representation of “Dancers.” She was honored to have her digital representation accepted into the show:

 

 

Viknins quotes Henry Ward Beecher in explaining the moral of this story: “Don’t forget those old works that set you on fire the first time! ‘Home should be an oratorio of the memory, singing to all our afterlife melodies and harmonies of old remembered joy.’”

 


Attention Pen Women! We’d love to see your best work for possible publication as Art of the Week. Please review the general submission guidelines on our web site and send only one work per email as a low resolution file. Put Art of the Week Submission in the subject line and provide the information seen in the posts (title/medium/name/branch). Your submission may then be made to Darlene Yeager-Torre at arteditor@nlapw.org. Thank you!

 

Creative Inspirational Wisdom: From Lullabies to Gap Years

This week, Sheila Firestone, Composer, discusses how her grandchildren provide inspiration for her creativity.


 

From the days of their births, to the daily conversations, I do not know exactly when or how the new composition ideas will arrive, but they do. Staring at Lital’s birth picture, in the Sylvester Cancer Center doctors’ waiting room, the words and melody for “I’ve Stamped your Picture on my Heart,” arrives. This song later becomes part of a curriculum and series of songs, a Songs for a New Day program called Sing and Think.

 

From photos of little girls growing up in Northern, Israel, to “Welcome Little Wonder” (a song for Emily), “Berceuse” for Noah, and lullabies for Maya and Allie, six grandchildren have become my sources of inspiration. The oldest, now 22, is on a fellowship, in another country. Three others recently had their first work experiences. Their challenges often become my musical challenges, works derived from the joy of savoring who they are, what they face, their delights and how each meets and greets the day. A recent event in Charlottesville, Virginia, where the oldest received her master’s degree and taught, another’s struggles to achieve excellence on the job, other internships, and gap years with studies abroad have all become part of my musical collections.

 

 

Works are begun by nothing more than a touch, a photo, a Facebook moment, a tug of the heart, a tear, a smile, a skip and a Hi, Grandma. How are you? text message. I hear this story repeated by many grandparents. We tell the stories, and paint their moments in our works.  We are filled with the joy of expectation and the hope that our grandchildren’s lives will impact the world.

 

Lital’s third birthday present brings “The Peace Patch” dance suite and curriculum. The premiere was planned for our visit to the Israeli “Gan” preschool. “The Grandchildren’s Suite,” piano anthology, commemorates the budding interests of the six, as does the arrival of “The Cat Sarah,” who plays Kitten on the Keys quite well.

 

“Miriam and the Women of the Desert,” a musical/operetta, includes several lullabies originally written for the grandchildren. “Peace Child,” was created for Allie’s birth. I use it in the Miriam work to depict Mother Yocheved singing her hopes to the baby Moses. Batya, his Egyptian mother, sings “In the Cradle of Mankind.” The opening Prologue, begins with the search for God. It calls chorally on a number of modern Hebrew names given to God. It was inspired by a small child’s private conversation with God outside. An internship or a first job with its challenges now becomes a sonata or symphony.

 

These are my tributes to youth and my hopes for their success. I am grateful that the ideas translate into musical ideas to play with when I am not with these young people as they continue on their paths. So thank you, dear Grandchildren, for a lifetime of inspiration. I am always with you, continuing to be filled with wonder by your actions. May you always find joy as you use your energies to fulfill your dreams.

 

 


Sheila Meyerowitz – Firestone was born in the Bronx and has been a student of musical composition since 1987.  She retired after twenty-five years of teaching Communications to gifted elementary students in North Miami Beach, FL.  Firestone studied in the studios of Joseph Dillon Ford, and with Dr. Tom McKinley at Lynn University Conservatory of Music and Dr. Keith Paulson Thorpe. In 2016, Sheila won the NLAPW, 2nd Place, Vinnie Ream Award in Music for Waters of Transformation. She is President of the Boca Raton Branch NLAPW. Learn more about her at her web site, sheilafirestone.com.   


“Berceuse” sheet music provided by S. Firestone.

OUR GUEST BLOGGING SERIES WILL END ON OCTOBER 13th. Submissions for the series are now closed. We thank all Pen Women who submitted work for our Creative Inspirational Wisdom and It’s A Creative Business guest blogger series. We look forward to giving an update on the status of Creative Genius at Work, an anthology that will include posts from these two series, soon.

Art of the Week: Dark Woman

Dorothy Atkins

Santa Clara County Branch NLAPW

Dark Woman

Acrylic, 18” x 22”

 

Dorothy Atkins comes from a family of wonderful story tellers and has been creating her own stories with words and color since she was a child. Her grandmother would often tell her “to not only look but to see.” Self taught, Atkins has mainly concentrated her efforts in acrylics and oils but has recently taken up watercolors too.

 

Atkins is inspired by her colorful dreams of the people and places that left an impression on her. “Being surrounded by a lifetime of wonderful, intelligent, courageous, beautiful, strong and gentle women, Dark Woman presented herself to me in different forms. I painted her because I had to.”

 

Several of her paintings have won awards and are in the homes of collectors around the world.

 


Attention Pen Women! We’d love to see your best work for possible publication as Art of the Week. Please review the general submission guidelines on our web site and send only one work per email as a low resolution file. Put Art of the Week Submission in the subject line and provide the information seen in the posts (title/medium/name/branch). Your submission may then be made to Darlene Yeager-Torre at arteditor@nlapw.org. Thank you!


It’s A Creative Business: Eight Steps to Better Profitability

This week, Katie Turner discusses how to put—and keep—your creative business “in the black.”


 

Turning your creative business into a profit-making enterprise can be a great challenge. The balance between time spent creating and time spent developing your business is definitely something you’ll be challenged with, but once you get this balance under control, you’ll start to see results.

 

Here are eight tips that will help put your creative business in the black:

 

STEP 1: Have a strong, consistent body of works. In other words, display your best paintings and leave the rest home. Not that perfection is the goal, but present a product that you’re really proud of and can stand behind. Ask yourself if you’re presenting a cohesive body of works. Can customers get a sense of you as an artist? When people feel like they understand you and your style, they’re more likely to buy.

 

STEP 2: Optimize for individual buyers. This is where knowing your customer can really help. Many artists have a variety of sizes and prices, and sell more than just originals. Some artists sell prints, giclees, magnets, bookmarks, posters, scarves, and more. Giving customers options is good for business.

 

STEP 3: Create daily. Post daily. If you’re creating regularly, you have new work to post regularly. Using social media to promote your product gives potential customers an excuse to visit your shop. (It’s probably not a good idea to post a lot of items at once, though; that overwhelms people.)

 

STEP 4: Add the tags. When using social media, be sure to use relevant tags and descriptions. What is the sense of having beautiful artwork that nobody can locate? When tagging or writing descriptions, think about what a customer might search for when looking for something like your product. (For example, several descriptive words have been added to the painting listing below.)

 

 

A cautionary note: Don’t do “keyword stuffing.” This is where people tag everything just to get a lot of short-term views on their product. Google bots recognize this and penalize you by keeping you out of search results. A potential customer could find your product and see no relationship between what you’ve tagged and what the actual content of your artwork is, and it leaves a bad taste. Don’t give the customer a reason to avoid you.

 

STEP 5: Share your products. Don’t be afraid to put your products out there on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, Snapchat, etc. By letting your network know you have great new products, you’re keeping them interested. If you’re concerned about theft, limit your images to smaller sizes and use a copyright symbol with your name embedded in the image. Tutorials are available online to help with embedding copyrights.

 

STEP 6: Give ‘em what they want. If you’re getting a lot of orders or “likes” on a specific style item, why not keep your customers happy with more similar products? On a side note, remember to put out products that are relevant to the season—for example: back-to-school, college gear, Christmas or holiday times. Work 4-8 weeks in advance in order to give customers time to pick up your product and then have time to deliver it before the holiday.

 

STEP 7: Have Marketing Materials. This probably goes without saying, but make sure you always have a business card on you. You never know when you will meet a new customer. Hand out postcards of your work and include your website on the back.

 

STEP 8: Plan your goals. It’s so easy for a creative individual to get distracted. Having a written business plan and daily goals can really help. Setting goals is also a great way to control your time (artistically and otherwise) and you’ll find you won’t waste as much time or money aimlessly.

 

Making a living off your art can be a challenging job. You’ll end up spending a lot of time hustling the business side of it, but it’s all worth it when you realize you’re doing what you love.

 


Katie Turner is a watercolor artist in the Central New York Branch NLAPW.  Working in watercolor since the ‘90s, Turner began experimenting with different substrates in the last few years. “I like the potential and challenge of slick paper,” Turner explains. Turner spent many years in the graphic arts field, writing craft articles, publishing ‘zines and working with various media, but she never strays far from watercolor. Visit her website at http://www.ktartstudio.com/.

Screenshots provided by K. Turner.

OUR GUEST BLOGGING SERIES WILL END ON OCTOBER 13th. Submissions for the series are now closed.  We thank all Pen Women who submitted work for our Creative Inspirational Wisdom and It’s A Creative Business guest blogger series. We look forward to giving an update on the status of Creative Genius at Work, an anthology that will include posts from these two series, soon.

Art of the Week: Bleached White is the New Coral

Bev Goldie

Central Ohio Branch

Bleached White is the New Coral

Encaustic

 

Bev Goldie has recently switched her medium of choice from oil painting to encaustics (molten wax and Damar resin). After viewing some stunning encaustic works in New York and Florida Ritz Carlton hotels, she made the commitment to learn how to do them.  There weren’t any classes in Ohio, so with much experimentation, attending workshops and hard work, she learned to create encaustics. Goldie exhibits her work, some of which have won awards and teaches workshops and classes in Ohio at the Columbus Cultural Art Center. Her public Facebook page, Encaustics by Bev Goldie, shows many techniques, finished works for those who may want to know more about this ancient art form, and lists classes.

You may also see more of her work at: www.bgtproductions.com

 

 


Attention Pen Women! We’d love to see your best work for possible publication as Art of the Week. Please review the general submission guidelines on our web site and send only one work per email as a low resolution file. Put Art of the Week Submission in the subject line and provide the information seen in the posts (title/medium/name/branch). Your submission may then be made to Darlene Yeager-Torre at arteditor@nlapw.org. Thank you!

Creative Inspirational Wisdom: From Where or What Do You Draw Inspiration?

This week, Lois Batchelor Howard personifies poetic inspiration in a rural location.


 

I am blessed or cursed.  I don’t know which.  Perhaps both.  If I describe my living on a farm, that will possibly explain why or how I write.  I’ll give it a go.

 

Every time I look behind the house or the barn, for that matter, I see them there or I see them coming.  Actually, they’ve been coming for a long time.  They’re odd things: sometimes strange, always different, fascinating somehow. They’re always there, it seems. Grandma Bryce might have called them “wonderful pains,” like she described the aches in her legs that would not go away.

 

They have me caught; I know that.

 

When I’ve had the courage, I’ve asked my neighbors. Funny… they don’t see them, and they give me looks like I give a field of corn that for no reason I can figure out has suddenly stopped growing. Or is it the look I feel when it’s harvest time and the combine has broken down? Maybe it’s more like I’m asking ’em to an opera and they know that I know, more than the smell of bundled hay in the early dew of dawn, that they love country music. Whatever. I can’t pinpoint the look, but I’ve felt it before; it’s not a stranger to me. It’s kind of “puttin’ up with,” and it unsettles me some, but not enough to stop seeing those things.

 

They sit atop the trees on the horizon by Nelson Rathbun’s place, and they often shoot right out of the setting sun or the rising sun. I see lots of both, but there are more chores in the mornings.  They ride the backs of cows. Sometimes they get the chickens clucking and squawking, and the hogs squalling and the dogs barking, runnin’ around in frenzied circles, the horses bolting their heads sideways, restlessly shifting their weight back and forth in closed stalls.

 

Yes, these things have found me. They are powerful things, I tell you. I know I said it before, but it seems they are always here. Sometimes they’re in my boots when I go to put ’em on in the morning or they stick to my high-tops after a heavy rain, when I’ve had to gluck trough-deep in mud.  At times, they even leap out in the black of night. They’re here, all right, and—how does the expression go?  They must have seen me coming!  Or I, them.

 

I could use a lot of fancy words, maybe. Straight of it is, we get along. Oh, sometimes I put ‘em off, but mostly I grin and welcome them in. You don’t get that much company with all this land around and the houses so far apart. I don’t even always treat them to electricity; sometimes I light an old oil lamp and over the oilcloth table cover, shadows visiting on the walls, we sit down together. I rustle up some hot tea and biscuits and blank papers, set the ink jar down, and dip my quill into the ink that somehow reminds me of the clear spring water trickling down near the pond at the top of the hill. But I’m getting’ off the subject, in a way, and I’m repeatin’ myself. I tend to do that. My listeners keep reminding me that I do, but you do what ya gotta do.

 

“Friend-Things,” I say, “What poems do you have for me today?” and as they keep prattling on, which is our way when we’re together, I write. Oh, sometimes we take a break and check the larder or the root cellar. They tell me that’s why they come, and sometimes we gaze out over the acres and know there’s a lot of promise in that old Spring earth, buds of words and greens sproutin’ up all over… Why, those things now, out there again, dancin’, like they own the place.

 

They’ve been lookin’ over my shoulder, and they say they like readin’, that I draw inspiration from livin’ here on the farm and listenin’ to them. Gotta’ give credit where credit is due.

 


Like many of you, Lois Batchelor Howard likes to write. She admits she is possessed! She graduated from the University of Michigan in Music (pipe organ) and through years of rich musical experiences, the music of words became her favorite music. Gratefully, she is a much-published and award-winning author, and she loves being a Pen Woman.  A longtime member of La Jolla Branch, she served as its president for five years.  After moving to Desert Hot Springs, Lois now enjoys being a member of the Palm Springs Branch NLAPW. 

 

“Working Barn” by Maggie Smith / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

OUR GUEST BLOGGING SERIES IS ENDING SOON: Pen Women are invited to submit guest posts or artwork for our two series, Creative Inspirational Wisdom and It’s A Creative Business, up until Thursday, August 31st, 2017. Please visit this link for more details. We look forward to reading your material!

 

Creative Inspirational Wisdom: Season to Season

This week, Sara Etgen-Baker reflects on the inspiration to be found in nature and solitude.


 

When the alarm sounded, I wanted to continue sleeping.  Instead, I slid out of the warm sheets away from the comfort of my husband’s body; peeked through the Venetian blinds; and noticed graceful flakes of pearly-white lace had dusted the tree-lined trails adjacent to my home.  Even though the mercury hovered just below freezing, I knew today was the perfect day for a solitary winter run.  So, I quietly donned my winter running clothes and headed downstairs.

 

Daylight had not yet turned the slumberous, dark blue clouds to their morning gray, and—for a moment—I hesitated at my front door not wanting to disturb winter’s peaceful silence.  When I stepped outside, my warm breath mingled with the crisp, cold air as it stung my cheeks.  As I began to run, my stiff legs begged me to turnaround; I ignored their cries knowing they would soon stop complaining.  Only my footfalls broke the silence as the gentle snow crunched under my feet.

 

As I ran through the woods that morning, nary an animal crossed my path; their tracks in the snow indicated that they had been here before me though.  The nippy air frosted my breath, and soon my breathing mixed with my footfalls creating a rhythm.  I ran effortlessly past fallen trees along the creek side with no thought of time or distance.  I wasn’t aware of speed either—just movement.

 

I ran past an icy pond cloaked by barren, frost-covered trees trembling like skeletons in the brisk wind.  Snow began falling around me making me feel as if I was running in a snow globe.  Soon, winter’s tranquility and purity enveloped me; time and distance became meaningless, and I imagined that the woods looked as it once did 100 years ago. I gazed into the distance; and for a brief moment, I thought I saw Henry David Thoreau standing outside his cabin near Walden Pond.  He was not there, of course; and there was no one and nothing except for what was right in front of me—miles of glorious solitude.

 

For years I’ve run alone along these trails in the woods—a quiet, almost sacred place every bit as wondrous as Walden Pond.  Generally, the only sounds I regularly hear on these solitary runs are birds chirping; small animals collecting nuts; and my feet as they gently land on leaves, pine straws, or snow.  I occasionally hear the pitter-patter of rain drops as they hit leaves and fall onto the underbrush and forest floor.  Sometimes a light rain cools my perspiring body and soothes my spirit.  Frequently, I immerse myself in my thoughts and dreams and feel invigorated.  Other times, the solitude nourishes the seeds of stories germinating in my head.

 

Here in the woods, though, solitude—as silent and powerful as light itself—forces introspection.  So, I linger in the solitude emptying and quieting my mind; then, I let go of the world and my ego—journeying inwards.  Here, I sometimes hear my inner voice whispering to me; I occasionally meet myself face-to-face and find the being within—the true self—that has been waiting patiently to be discovered.  I continue running—grateful for the solitude and the balance I now feel.  But at some point, I must turn around; follow my footprints; and return in the direction from whence I came.  Reluctantly, I approach the end of my solitary run—not wanting it to be over.

 

From season to season, I’ve run alone along the quiet trails in the nearby woods; and I’ve taken great pleasure in the solitude it offers.  And to quote Thoreau, “I have an immense appetite for solitude, like an infant for sleep…” I discovered long ago that solitude is necessary for me, for that’s where my creativity dwells.  And I can no more live without creativity than I can live without sleep.

 


Sara’s love for words began when her mother read the dictionary to her every night. Her manuscripts have been published in various anthologies and magazines including Chicken Soup for the Soul, Guideposts, Wisdom Has A Voice, My Heroic Journey, Times They Were A Changing: Women Remember the 60s and 70s, and The Santa Claus Project. When not writing, Sara spends time with her husband of 34 years, Bill. Sara has been a member of the Dallas Branch NLAPW since 2014.  She enjoys the support and fellowship her affiliation with NLAPW brings into her writing life.  She may be contacted via email at: sab_1529@yahoo.com.

“Snowy Forest” by dan / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

WANTED: GUEST BLOGGERS! Pen Women are invited to submit guest posts (or artwork) for our two series, Creative Inspirational Wisdom and It’s A Creative Business, up until Thursday, August 31st, 2017. Please visit this link for more details. We look forward to reading your material!

 

Art of the Week: “Roots and Wings”

Roots and Wings

Bronze, life-size

Renate Burgyan Fackler

Central Ohio Branch

 

 

Roots and Wings, a life-size bronze sculpture by artist Renate Burgyan Fackler, was inspired by a poem of the same title. In this sculpture, a young girl is releasing a bird encouraging it to embrace life. She is both grounded and suspended at the same time. “I strive to bring my sculptures to life, engaging my audience in an emotionally uplifting experience,” Fackler said.

 

This sculpture, like many of her works, was created using the complex method of lost wax bronze casting.

 

A member of the Central Ohio Branch, Fackler’s works are found in the collections of The Museum of Women in the Arts, The White House, John Glen International Airport, The Ohio State University, and private individuals.

 

To learn more about Renate Fackler, her studio, and her work visit her website at https://chrysalissculpturestudio.com/blog/.

 


Attention Pen Women! We’d love to see your best work for possible publication as Art of the Week. Please review the general submission guidelines on our web site and send only one work per email as a low resolution file. Put Art of the Week Submission in the subject line and provide the information seen in the posts (title/medium/name/branch). Your submission may then be made to Darlene Yeager-Torre at arteditor@nlapw.org. Thank you!