Iranian poet and a poem

The World Wide Web is indeed just that. For artists, it provides an opportunity to connect with other artists worldwide on our screens the way NLAPW provides creative interactions in our own communities.

Today, it is an honor to share with with you the work of Iranian poet Shima Nesari Haghighi Fard. One young woman’s voice in an otherwise loud universe. Let us listen.

I have the power inside

By: Shima Nesari Haghighi Fard

How can your hair feel the Sun?
While my hair should touch a scarf
And I should step yet not run
As you do under the sky

I have the power inside
To grow a seed of mankind
And have the mercy to nourish my child
But what do you have as a man?

If you believe to have four of me
And I to love only you
Then how should I share your bed with glee?
And still you do not let me free

I am neither a washing machine nor a slave
I am a woman, just like your mother
Who thought you how to be brave
Now you demand me night and day

And you do believe, I am half of what you are
How can a half grow a seed of your kind?
Why can your body touch the air?
While I should hide my body for your deed

I am not just a meat with a skin
Look inside my spirit you will find more
Then my hair will not drown you in sin

But will show you my heavenly core

by Shima Nesari Haghighi Fard

Shima Nesari Haghighi Fard, was born on 11 July 1984, at Tehran, the capital city of Iran. At the age of six she traveled to Ireland-Dublin with her family, and went to school there. Shima was almost ten, when she returned to Tehran and continued her school studies.

In 2003 Shima traveled to Malaysia, and started her university studies in electronics-robotics engineering.

After an year in 2004 she traveled back to Iran and continued her university studies in the field of mechanical- mechatronics engineering in Sharif University of Technology, and while she was at Sharif University she had two of her poems published in Iran daily newspaper.

Shima’s short fictions and poems are submitted and published in newspapers and websites. Her first writing “Death” was submitted in 2005 in Raha Pen. Some of her poems are translated from English into Arabic and have been found in various Arab nations’ websites, newspapers and magazines. In 2011 four of her poems were translated into Arabic and published in A Mirror Chewed the Buttons of My Dress, a collection of poems by sixteen women poets around the world. Shima’s first poetry book Dance of the Wind was published in Summer 2012.

Comments

  1. love u shima

  2. i admire the poet’s ability of sharing the exact truth, but as an iranian girl i believe, todays most of the people, specially in iran, dont consent to lack of women’s right.

  3. This poem is the voice of all the women who do not have a chance to speak.
    I am really proud of my friend Shima, who has an incredible vision of women`s right, she is a good engineer, and a great poet. Her poems have a deep meaning and I always enjoy reading them.

  4. What a profound poem. So glad you shared it and her background.

  5. My dear Shima ,thank you for your beautiful poem ,
    I hope for that day that no where in the world neglects women’s feeling and abilities

  6. My dear Shima, thank you for your beautiful poem,
    I hope for that day that no where in the world neglects women’s feelings and anbilities

  7. My lovely wife, Shima.
    From the first day that we met she was concerned for human rights, especially women’s right in the Middle East , and I who was studying law , agreed with her . As an Iranian juristic I believe the lack of women’s right in the Middle East should be highlighted, every one should know and understand this matter, and I am sure with each others help, this problem will be solved in the near future.
    Thank you for sharing this poem.

    • Thank you for sharing your thoughts with us as well. In the way that Apartheid was exposed, I believe we should be taking the lack of women’s rights and the violence against women in the Middle East seriously. Shima is a beacon; let light shine on oppressive practices.–Treanor

  8. Dawn Huntley Spitz says:

    To hear the voice of one of these suppressed women is very moving. It shows that there will eventually be change when you see how much inner strength they have.

  9. Lois Batchelor Howard says:

    This is so profoundly touching. Truth is often unbearable to read. We who have had and have such a different life from yours are double to triple touched. Empathetically we grieve that this has been your life and that of so many of your ‘sisters;’ selfishly we are quietly grateful for our own “free” lives, and, thirdly, we pray that this kind of male dominance will cease. I, an elderly woman who lives in Desert Hot Springs, CA, tries to think of what I may do to help. I’ve chosen daily prayer. Constant hope and blessings upon and for thee and thine, Thank you for your eye-opening (and even in its sadness,) beautiful poem. Lois

  10. I love this poem by Shima Nesari Haghighi Fard. I have often wondered how iranian women feel about the exact things she writes about. I would feel the same about those cultural restrictions. I am glad her poetry gets published. Thank you for making it the Poem of the Week.
    Mary Joan Meagher, Minnesota Branch.

  11. Barb Whitmarsh says:

    THE POWER OF THE TRUTH IN THIS POEM IS ITS TRUE POWER; WELL DONE AND THANK YOU FOR SHARING.

    BARB WHITMARSH
    ST. LOUIS BRANCH
    NLAPW

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